Columns of the Temple of Augustus | Barcelona Bus Turístic

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Columns of the Temple of Augustus

The origins of the Roman city in the 1st century BC

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A courtyard of a medieval building hides the remains of Barcino, the Roman settlement that gave rise to the current city of Barcelona. It is four columns that belonged to the Temple of Augustus, built more than 2,000 years ago on the summit of Mount Tàber, the hill where Barcelona was born.

Why visit the columns of the Temple of Augustus?

Carrer del Paradís, 10, is home to a building from the 15th century that is the headquarters of the Centre Excursionista de Catalunya (hiking and outdoors association). On the door there is a millstone that marks the highest point of what was the Roman city, Mount Tàber, a little over 16 metres. In a side courtyard of this building you will find the remains of the Temple of Augustus, which dates back to the end of the 1st century BC.

This temple, which was the central part of the Roman forum, was absorbed by various buildings during the Early Middle Ages. The only remnants that were conserved were three columns, which formed part of the Gothic building that, in the early 20th century, was acquired by the Centre Excursionista de Catalunya. During the restoration work, an internal courtyard was created to conserve the three columns. A fourth was reconstructed with archaeological remains and was exhibited at Plaça del Rei. It was not until 1956 that a decision was made to return it to its original location.

 

How do you get to the Temple of Augustus?

The Temple of Augustus is located on Carrer del Paradís, which is behind Barcelona Cathedral. You can get there by hopping off at the Barri Gòtic stop on the Red Route of Barcelona Bus Turístic.

 

For the most curious of you

  • Did you know? It was the architect Domènech i Montaner, one of the learned members of the Centre Excursionista de Catalunya, who, when renovating the association’s medieval premises, decided to display these spectacular Roman columns, which had previously been concealed and divided on various floors.
  • Local’s tip: If you want to take photographs of the columns, use a wide-angle lens as the space is too small to take a good photo with your mobile phone.
  • A must: For those who want to discover one of the best-kept secrets of Barcelona.